Games and activities

Games & Activities for all Settings

ABC game (Hepatitis C Council of NSW)

http://www.hepatitisc.org.au/documents/ABCgame_000.swf

This is an interactive knowledge based game that tests participants’ knowledge of hepatitis A, B and C transmission, disease course, testing and treatment.

Box Project Activity 9.1 – The values continuum (Hepatitis Council of QLD)

This is an exercise that can be initiated within a small or large group setting, or adapted as a group brainstorming exercise to challenge and explore people’s social values in relation to hepatitis C. This exercise helps workshop participants to clarify their own value system and address negative attitudes that could lead to discrimination.

Preparation

Examples statements

If this activity becomes uncomfortable for participants or different viewpoints create conflict between viewpoints of other participants be sure to explain that this exercise requires no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ answers and that everyone is entitled to their views and beliefs.

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Sexhepady

This game was developed by an educator at the Hepatitis Council of Queensland and is based on the game show Jeopardy.

Activities for schools

Hepatitis C and Body Art (Hepatitis C Council of Victoria)

http://www.hepcvic.org.au/informationresources/bodyart.html

The resource contains several activities suitable for use in the secondary school environment.

  1. The Body Art Continuum activity introduces the idea of body art and how different forms of body art are viewed by society (from “normal” to “?” to “ strange”). Examples of different forms of body art are provided.
  2. The Famous activity involves students in small group discussions about body art, society and youth culture. Students will identify famous people with body art and discuss whether their body art influences the way body art is viewed by society.
  3. The Ink activity involves role play in a tattoo parlour which provides students with the opportunity to visualise and understand the issue of blood awareness and cross contamination in a body art context.
  4. Hep C quiz provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge of hepatitis C.

Talking sexual health (Australian Research Centre for Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University)

http://www.latrobe.edu.au/cleu/TSH.htm

The resource outlines a series of activities about hepatitis C such as Safety in numbers (p.81), Rights and responsibilities (p.82) and Sex, drugs and making choices (p.186).

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What is this hep C thing? (Education and Resource Centre)

http://www.hepc.com.au/

The activity is an interactive web site for young people on hepatitis C in the body art setting. This is now being produced as a stand alone CD with background notes for teachers and classroom activities. The CD kit is expected to be available in 2008.

HepCtransmission.com

www.hepctransmission.com

Online hepatitis C information site for young Vietnamese people developed by young people. Features two “mini movies” on hepatitis C transmission and offers the opportunity to win prizes after completing an online knowledge quiz.

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Other

Other warm up activities and exercises could be adapted from Miller and Mahamati (2000) who developed a series of activities related to HIV/AIDS training.
http://www.hreoc.gov.au/pdf/human_rights/Not_round_here.pdf


Miller & Mahamati (2000). ‘Not Round Here; Affirming Diversity, Challenging Homophobia Rural Service Providers Training Manual’, Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission
[HREOC], Sydney.

Ollis, D. & Mitchell, A. (2001). Talking Sexual Health: a teaching and learning resource for secondary schools. Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society at La Trobe University for The Australian National Council on AIDS, Hepatitis and Related Disease (ANCAHRD).